Energy

  • May 28, 2024

    Justices Pass On Fight Over FERC Power Market Cap Rule

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a D.C. Circuit decision backing the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's change of bidding practices for electricity capacity auctions run by PJM Interconnection, the nation's largest regional grid operator.

  • May 24, 2024

    China Tariffs To Return For Air Fryers, Bikes, Chairs In June

    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced Friday the end of tariff relief for hundreds of items currently exempt from duties covering over $300 billion worth of Chinese goods, with mainly commercial product exclusions set to continue.

  • May 24, 2024

    Red States Target Blue States In Push To End Climate Torts

    A novel red-state request that the U.S. Supreme Court nix climate change torts brought by state governments against fossil fuel companies can be seen as an attempt to urge the justices not to pass up another opportunity to weigh in on the issue, legal experts told Law360.

  • May 24, 2024

    Enbridge Says Oil Transport Monopoly Claims Lack Merit

    Enbridge Inc. fired back at an antitrust suit accusing it of intentionally killing a pipeline terminal project that would have resulted in the company losing its monopoly power over crude oil transportation in the Chicago area, calling for an Illinois federal judge to dismiss the claims.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ohio Justices Say Regulator Must Take Freezing Death Case

    An Ohio trial court cannot hear a lawsuit seeking to hold Dominion Energy liable for a woman's freezing death after her natural gas was shut off, the state Supreme Court ruled Friday, reasoning the matter belongs before the state's utilities regulator because the shutoff was an act authorized by the utility.

  • May 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Again Upholds Engineers' OT Win

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Friday backed for the second time a lower court's ruling that two engineers receiving a weekly minimum salary as part of their compensation package were not overtime-exempt and sent the case back to the district court to determine damages awards.

  • May 24, 2024

    Atty Says Loss Of BP Spill Claim Was Client's Fault, Not Firm's

    Texas attorney Brent W. Coon has told a Houston court that his firm's alleged botching of a former client's lawsuit stemming from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill was actually the client's fault, as he failed to provide the firm with a sworn statement to attach to his complaint per a court's order.

  • May 24, 2024

    Engineering Co. Mismanaged 401(k) Plan, Ex-Worker Says

    An engineering company forced participants in its $5.1 billion retirement plan to pay lofty administrative fees by automatically enrolling them into expensive managed account programs, thereby breaching federal benefits law, according to a proposed class action filed in Virginia federal court Friday.

  • May 24, 2024

    Chinese Reinsurer Seeks Exit From Reimbursement Suit

    A Chinese reinsurance company urged an Iowa federal court Friday to toss an insurer's suit seeking reimbursement for property insurance coverage claims it paid out, saying the court lacks jurisdiction because the company was not properly served.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    Colo. Judge Hints Regulator May Face Oil Biz Contract Claims

    A Colorado state judge seemed inclined to agree with an oil company's argument that a settlement with state regulators to resolve alleged violations was close enough to a contract to take to trial the company's claims that regulators later broke the deal.

  • May 24, 2024

    Court Upholds Limit To Award In Ecopetrol, Texas Co. Dispute

    An arbitration tribunal was within its authority to limit the number of years and the amount that a Houston-based oil company had to reimburse Colombia's state-owned entity, Ecopetrol, for the value-added tax liability of a subsidiary while owned by the company, a New York federal judge determined.

  • May 24, 2024

    Union Carbide To Pay EPA $600K For Colo. Superfund Site

    Union Carbide Corp. and the federal government filed a $600,000 proposed settlement in Colorado federal court, resolving claims the company and its subsidiary owed more than $1.2 million in reimbursement costs connected to the cleanup of hazardous chemicals at a former uranium and vanadium processing facility.

  • May 24, 2024

    EPA Denies Ala. Coal Ash Management Program Application

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued a final decision denying Alabama's application to run a federally approved permit program to manage coal ash landfills and impoundments, saying the state's permit program doesn't meet federal standards for protecting people and waterways.

  • May 24, 2024

    No Private Suits Under State Enviro Law, Ill. Justices Say

    The daughter of a woman badly burned in a condominium complex explosion cannot bring bodily injury claims against Marathon Petroleum Co. and others under Illinois' environmental protection laws because they do not provide private statutory rights of action, the Illinois Supreme Court has ruled.

  • May 24, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen an IT engineer seek permission to search a landfill hiding a hard drive supposedly storing millions of pounds in bitcoin, Glencore take on legal action by American Century Investments, gold payment app Glint bring a breach of duty claim against FRP Advisory, and an ongoing dispute between a solicitor and the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 24, 2024

    IRS Corrects Notice On Bonus Energy Tax Credit Safe Harbors

    The Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Department of the Treasury issued a correction Friday to a notice providing additional safe harbors that clean energy project developers can use to qualify for bonus tax credits for domestically sourcing their steel and aluminum parts.

  • May 24, 2024

    EQT's $35B Equitrans Gas Merger Goes Unchallenged

    The waiting period for U.S. antitrust regulators to take action on EQT Corp.'s nearly $14 billion planned purchase of Equitrans Midstream Corp. has expired, putting one of the year's largest deals on the fast track to closing.

  • May 23, 2024

    Feds Ask 5th Circ. To Weigh Highway GHG Rule Vacatur

    The Biden administration has asked the Fifth Circuit to review a Texas district court's recent decision vacating a Federal Highway Administration rule that would've required states to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • May 23, 2024

    Spain Says Energy Treaty Withdrawal Irrelevant In $386M Suit

    Spain has told the D.C. Circuit that its announcement of withdrawal from the Energy Charter Treaty does not show it recognizes that it is still bound under the international agreement, contrary to what investors owed about $386 million argued earlier this week.

  • May 23, 2024

    Alaskan Youth Sue State Over $43B Natural Gas Project

    A group of children is suing Alaska to stop a $43 billion liquefied natural gas project, alleging the endeavor violates their rights under the state constitution to a climate system capable of sustaining human life, liberty and dignity.

  • May 23, 2024

    Resignation Letter Bylaws Targeted In Five Del. Class Actions

    General Motors Co. is among the latest targets of new bylaw-focused litigation from Abbott Cooper PLLC and Block & Leviton LLP, one of five companies in a series of lawsuits in Delaware's Chancery Court that seek to invalidate an "irrevocable resignation requirement" in company bylaws.

  • May 23, 2024

    22 States Seek To Defend EPA Heavy-Duty Truck GHG Rule

    A coalition of 22 Democrat-led states and four cities moved to intervene on Thursday in defense of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's final rule establishing greenhouse gas emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles, arguing that vacating the rule would lead to direct injuries to state lands and resources.

  • May 23, 2024

    Feds Agree To Clean, Close Dump Site For Tribal Nations

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has reached an agreement with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to properly clean and shut down a 70-year-old solid waste dump site on tribal lands in northern Arizona, saying federal law requirements for its closure haven't been followed since 1997.

  • May 23, 2024

    Irma Power Outage Claims Must Be Brought To Fla. Regulator

    A Florida state appellate court reversed the class certification in a multibillion-dollar lawsuit brought against Florida Power & Light Co. over extended electricity outages during Hurricane Irma, citing a new law requiring ratepayers to bring their claims before the state's Public Service Commission.

Expert Analysis

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Opinion

    We Need A Legislative Path To Power Plant Emissions Cuts

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    With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's newest regulation targeting power plant carbon emissions likely to be overturned by courts or a future administration, it's time for bipartisan legislation to preserve affordable, reliable electricity while substantially decarbonizing the sector by midcentury, say Jeffrey Holmstead at Bracewell and Samuel Thernstrom at the Energy Innovation Reform Project.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • 2 Oil Trader FCPA Pleas Highlight Fine-Reduction Factors

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    Recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlements with Gunvor and Trafigura — the latest actions in a yearslong sweep of the commodities trading industry — reveal useful data points related to U.S. Department of Justice policies on cooperation credit and past misconduct, say Michael DeBernardis and Laura Perkins at Hughes Hubbard.

  • Opinion

    NEPA Final Rule Unlikely To Speed Clean Energy Projects

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    A recent final rule from the White House Council on Environmental Quality purports to streamline federal environmental reviews to accelerate the construction of renewable energy infrastructure — but it also expands consideration of climate change and environmental justice, creating vast new opportunities for litigation and delay, says Thomas Prevas at Saul Ewing.

  • Tips For Companies Tapping Into Commercial Cleantech

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    A recent report from the European Patent Office and European Investment Bank examining the global financing and commercialization of cleantech innovation necessary for the green energy transition can help companies understand and solve the issues in developing and implementing the full potential of cleantech, says Eleanor Maciver at Mewburn Ellis.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • In Debate Over High Court Wording, 'Wetland' Remains Murky

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    Though the U.S. Supreme Court's decision limiting the Clean Water Act’s wetlands jurisdiction is now a year old, Sackett v. EPA's practical consequences for property owners are still evolving as federal agencies and private parties advance competing interpretations of the court's language and methods for distinguishing wetlands in lower courts, says Neal McAliley at Carlton Fields.

  • 5 Lessons From Ex-Vitol Trader's FCPA Conviction

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    The recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and money laundering conviction of former Vitol oil trader Javier Aguilar in a New York federal court provides defense takeaways on issues ranging from the definition of “domestic concern” to jury instruction strategy, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Geothermal Energy Has Growing Potential In The US

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    Bipartisan support for the geothermal industry shows that geothermal energy can be an elegant solution toward global decarbonization efforts because of its small footprint, low supply chain risk, and potential to draw on the skills of existing highly specialized oil and gas workers and renewable specialists, say attorneys at Weil.

  • Decoding Arbitral Disputes: The Benefits Of Non-EU Venues

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    In Spain v. Triodos, a Swedish appeal court recently annulled an intra-EU investment treaty award, reinforcing a growing trend in the bloc against enforcing such awards, and highlighting the advantages of initiating enforcement proceedings in common law jurisdictions, such as the U.K., says Josep Galvez at 4-5 Gray's Inn Square.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Salvaging The Investor-State Arbitration System's Legitimacy

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    Recent developments in Europe and Ecuador highlight the vulnerability of the investor-state arbitration framework, but arbitrators can avert a crisis by relying on a poorly understood doctrine of fairness and equity, rather than law, to resolve the disputes before them, says Phillip Euell at Diaz Reus.

  • NY's Vision For Grid Of The Future: Flexible, Open, Affordable

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    Acknowledging that New York state's progress toward its climate goals is stalling, the New York Public Service Commission's recent "Grid of the Future" order signals a move toward more flexible, cost-effective solutions — and suggests potential opportunities for nonutility participation, say Daniel Spitzer and William McLaughlin at Hodgson Russ.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Unwitting Disclosure, Agency Deference

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    Roke Iko at MoFo examines two U.S. Court of Federal Claims decisions highlighting factors to consider before filing a protest alleging Procurement Integrity Act violations, and a decision from the U.S. Government Accountability Office about the capacity of an agency to interpret its own solicitation terms.

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